Physics 1: Introduction to Newton's Second Law

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In today's free Physics 1 video on Newton's Second Law, Professor Pollock uses an air track to demonstrate once more Newton's First Law: basically an object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion. If you haven't seen one before, an air track is a structure where air is pumped through a hollow track with holes along it that allows air track carts to glide relatively friction-free. The concept is similar to an air hockey table as the air removes friction so objects move more freely. With the track he shows that when you add force to an object you increase its acceleration. Weights are then added to the cart to demonstrate acceleration is inversely proportional to mass. The goal of all these demonstrations is to prove Newton's Second Law, an equation, F = ma, which explains why objects accelerate and is the centerpiece of Physics 1.

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TrackBack URL: http://blog.thinkwell.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-tb.cgi/215

Physics 1 - Actions, Reactions, and Newton's Third Law from Official Thinkwell Blog - Articles and Free Videos for Math, Science, and more on February 9, 2011 2:35 PM

Newton's laws are key to understanding motion and how forces on an object can impact its motion. So far all the laws have been about a single object and the impact of outside forces upon it. With the first law, Newton showed that a body in motion remai... Read More

Physics 1 - Solving Problems Using Newton's Laws: Ropes and Tension from Official Thinkwell Blog - Articles and Free Videos for Math, Science, and more on February 10, 2011 2:14 PM

After watching our videos on Newton's laws, it's a good time to start looking at how to use these laws to solve physics problems. Today's free Physics 1 lecture begins with a demonstration of tension with a rope. Read More

Physics 1 - Weight from Official Thinkwell Blog - Articles and Free Videos for Math, Science, and more on February 22, 2011 2:39 PM

In everyday language, the words "mass" and "weight" are often used interchangeably. However, they are not the same thing and it is important to differentiate the two terms in physics. Mass is the amount of material an object contains, a measure of an o... Read More

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This page contains a single entry by April Stockwell published on February 8, 2011 11:50 AM.

Physics in Action: Toss-and-Catch from Two Points of View was the previous entry in this blog.

Physics 1 - Actions, Reactions, and Newton's Third Law is the next entry in this blog.

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